Posts tagged water
Setting up a Christmas Tree Siphon | Fleming's Christmas Tree Farm
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There's two schools of thought on Christmas trees: real? or artificial? There's definitely pro's and con's to both (I think my definition of purgatory is fluffing artificial tree branches for eternity), but one of the biggest con's to a live tree (the watering part) can be solved once and for all by reading this awesome "hack." Side note - my husband hates the term "hack". You should text him right now that you're reading about my tree hack. He'll love it. 

Growing up, we always had a live tree. My dad was firmly on #TeamReal, and I remember fondly the sight of his legs sticking out of the tree as he watered it with an empty 2 liter bottle. Brandon and I have carried on this tradition, and how lucky are we that we live in the Christmas Tree Capital of the World, Indiana PA?! Every year we head out to Flemings Christmas Tree Farm and pick out the perfect tree. Three years ago, I got a little tired of the 2-liter method, and went searching for a better way to water the tree that didn't end up soaking me or my carefully curated and wrapped Amazon haul. Behold, the tree siphon. Using things you can find at home and at your nearest hardware store, you too can keep your presents nice and dry and stop army crawling under your festive shrubbery.

I hope you enjoy some sweet and fun photos of our annual trip to the tree farm! Keep scrolling for the how-to details on setting up the tree siphon!

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How To Start A Tree Siphon:

Materials:

  • 3-4 feet plastic hose (1" diameter or less),

  • empty gallon jug with the top cut off. The opening should be big enough to put your fist through.

  • 4 cup glass measuring cup or other container to pour water

  • empty box big enough to hold the gallon jug and container using to pour water, wrapped like a present except for the top (left open)

  • wrapping paper

  • sharpie

  • 6" cut straight section of plastic hanger (optional)

  • zip ties (optional)

Method: 

  1. Place your tree in the stand and secure it, but don't loosen the bailing ropes yet.

  2. Keeping track of how much water you put in, fill the base of the tree stand until its 2" or so inches below the brim of the stand.

  3. Place the gallon jug in the wrapped box.

  4. Pour the same amount of water into the gallon jug as you did the tree stand, and draw a line on the jug with a sharpie where the water stops. This will be your water line so you can see what's in the stand at all times.

  5. Place the pouring container in the box beside your jug of water.

  6. If you are using the hanger piece and zip tie, place the hanger piece along the end of the tubing and zip tie, creating a "splint" at the end of the tube. Place this end (or just AN end if not using the hanger) into the tree stand.

  7. With this of the tubing securely in the stand, place your thumb over the other end of the tube

  8. Move your thumb just slightly back from completely covering the tube, and put the tube and your thumb in your mouth and being sucking the air out.

  9. Yep. You read that right. You WILL get water in your mouth. Sorry if that grosses you out, but it's so worth it not to crawl under the tree. Simply spit the water out, covering the tube with your thumb right away each time. You don't want to let air back in the tube.

  10. Once all air bubbles are out of the tube and it's completely filled with water, cover it with your thumb while it's still in your mouth. Look at the end of the tube where you're holding it. There should be no air in it at all. Keeping your thumb on the tube as you suck out the air helps IMMENSELY with this. Trust me.

  11. Put your entire hand (with the tube) into the gallon jug and submerge it.

  12. Let go of the tube and push it to the bottom of the jug.

  13. You may see little particles flowing through the tube. This is a GOOD SIGN!

  14. Slide the wrapped present box with your jug full of water and pouring container under the tree.

  15. Go brush your teeth.

  16. The next day (and after), re-fill the jug to the water line.

Photo Dec 01, 5 14 54 PM.jpg
Photo Dec 01, 5 12 52 PM.jpg
Photo Dec 01, 5 14 20 PM.jpg
Photo Dec 01, 8 13 45 PM.jpg
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Are You Watering Your Tree the Right Way? | Fleming's Christmas Tree Farms | Indiana, PA Family Photographer
Jill Gearhart Photography-4-2.jpg

There's two schools of thought on Christmas trees: real? or artificial? There's definitely pro's and con's to both (I think my definition of purgatory is fluffing artificial tree branches for eternity), but one of the biggest con's to a live tree (the watering part) can be solved once and for all by reading this awesome "hack." Side note - my husband hates the term "hack". You should text him right now that you're reading about my tree hack. He'll love it. 

Growing up, we always had a live tree. My dad was firmly on #TeamReal, and I remember fondly the sight of his legs sticking out of the tree as he watered it with an empty 2 liter bottle. Brandon and I have carried on this tradition, and how lucky are we that we live in the Christmas Tree Capital of the World, Indiana PA?! Every year we head out to Flemings Christmas Tree Farm and pick out the perfect tree. Three years ago, I got a little tired of the 2-liter method, and went searching for a better way to water the tree that didn't end up soaking me or my carefully curated and wrapped Amazon haul. Behold, the tree siphon. Using things you can find at home and at your nearest hardware store, you too can keep your presents nice and dry and stop army crawling under your festive shrubbery.

I hope you enjoy some sweet and fun photos of our annual trip to the tree farm! Keep scrolling for the how-to details on setting up the tree siphon!

Jill Gearhart Photography-1-2.jpg
Jill Gearhart Photography-6-2.jpg
Jill Gearhart Photography-3-2.jpg
Jill Gearhart Photography-5-2.jpg
Jill Gearhart Photography-7-2.jpg
Jill Gearhart Photography-9-2.jpg
Jill Gearhart Photography-10-2.jpg
Jill Gearhart Photography-11-2.jpg
Jill Gearhart Photography-12-2.jpg

How To Start A Tree Siphon:

Materials:

  • 3-4 feet plastic hose (1" diameter or less),
  • empty gallon jug with the top cut off. The opening should be big enough to put your fist through.
  • 4 cup glass measuring cup or other container to pour water
  • empty box big enough to hold the gallon jug and container using to pour water, wrapped like a present except for the top (left open)
  • wrapping paper
  • sharpie
  • 6" cut straight section of plastic hanger (optional)
  • zip ties (optional)

Method: 

  1. Place your tree in the stand and secure it, but don't loosen the bailing ropes yet.
  2. Keeping track of how much water you put in, fill the base of the tree stand until its 2" or so inches below the brim of the stand. 
  3. Place the gallon jug in the wrapped box.
  4. Pour the same amount of water into the gallon jug as you did the tree stand, and draw a line on the jug with a sharpie where the water stops. This will be your water line so you can see what's in the stand at all times.
  5. Place the pouring container in the box beside your jug of water.
  6. If you are using the hanger piece and zip tie, place the hanger piece along the end of the tubing and zip tie, creating a "splint" at the end of the tube. Place this end (or just AN end if not using the hanger) into the tree stand.
  7. With this of the tubing securely in the stand, place your thumb over the other end of the tube
  8. Move your thumb just slightly back from completely covering the tube, and put the tube and your thumb in your mouth and being sucking the air out.
  9. Yep. You read that right. You WILL get water in your mouth. Sorry if that grosses you out, but it's so worth it not to crawl under the tree. Simply spit the water out, covering the tube with your thumb right away each time. You don't want to let air back in the tube.
  10. Once all air bubbles are out of the tube and it's completely filled with water, cover it with your thumb while it's still in your mouth. Look at the end of the tube where you're holding it. There should be no air in it at all. Keeping your thumb on the tube as you suck out the air helps IMMENSELY with this. Trust me. 
  11. Put your entire hand (with the tube) into the gallon jug and submerge it. 
  12. Let go of the tube and push it to the bottom of the jug.
  13. You may see little particles flowing through the tube. This is a GOOD SIGN!
  14. Slide the wrapped present box with your jug full of water and pouring container under the tree.
  15. Go brush your teeth.
  16. The next day (and after), re-fill the jug to the water line.
Photo Dec 01, 5 14 54 PM.jpg
Photo Dec 01, 5 12 52 PM.jpg
Photo Dec 01, 5 14 20 PM.jpg
Photo Dec 01, 8 13 45 PM.jpg
blog-signoff_4.jpg
Do You REALLY Need Engagement Photos? | Fall Engagement Photographer in Indiana, PA
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When you are planning a wedding, every expense might be carefully weighed and considered. Do you REALLY need a 20 minute fireworks show after dinner? Do you need a 200 pound clump of florals and eucalyptus as your ceremony backdrop? Do you really need escort cards made from marble tiles and hand-lettered with 14K gold ink? Some wedding trends, while absolutely gorgeous, make me giggle. Of course, how extravagant you are depends on your dream and your budget, but an expense I think most brides may consider is whether to do engagement photos or not. My opinion is obviously YES! GET ENGAGEMENT PHOTOS TAKEN! But not necessarily for my own financial gain but for the benefits I talk about below! So keep reading, soonly-wed!

HIGH QUALITY, PERSONAL DECOR

While the obvious benefit of engagement photos is to make memories and have some beautiful shots to share on social media, a really great reason to "go for it" with engagement photos is the beautiful, high quality decor options now available to you for your wedding. I've had couples make their guest books from engagement photos, or even great a guest "book" with a large print and have guests sign the matting in the frame. Engagement photos can be used as centerpiece elements for your wedding OR your bridal shower if the timing works out! The last time I was blessed to be a bridesmaid, we used photos from the couples engagement session as a cute element to the book-themed centerpieces for the brides shower - and everyone ended up taking them home! What a great keepsake! You can also use your engagement photos for your save the date cards and newspaper announcements!

 

GETTING TO KNOW YOUR PHOTOGRAPHER

This is my faaavvvvorite reason why I will always recommend any couple gets engagement photos taken. Getting in front of a camera, in front of a stranger, and told to look happy, serene, joyful, and at ease is just. plain. weird. There are a million questions running through your mind about how you look, if your hair is cooperating, how your smile seems, and just what is this photographer thinking about you!? By getting photos done BEFORE your wedding day, you and your fiancé have a chance to connect with the photographer, tell stories, learn likes and dislikes, and just build a relationship. Think of your engagement photos like your first date with your photographer. Now that we've gotten all the awkward "so what do you like to do?" "what's your favorite _____" questions out of the way during the client meeting and engagement shoot, everyone will feel more at east and relaxed on the wedding day, where the photos count the most! 

Getting to know Morgan and Daniel, the couple featured here, has been an absolute blast! We both have mutual friends through our church, and even though Morgan served on our volunteer teams for a short time, doing an engagement shoot was still very beneficial to see the chemistry between her and her fiancé Daniel. Some couples are super silly. Some are super serious. Some act more as friends, and some just want to make out the whole time! I was so happy to come along to not only capture some stunning scenery (these kids love to explore and were down for a hike!), but capture the sweet, silly, and carefree relationship that they have. It was as if I wasn't there at times, which of course is every photographer's dream! I hope you enjoy the beautiful moments we captured of this enchanting couple. (I bet they are giggling at the fact that I called them enchanting) :)

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SEE THE FULL GALLERY HERE!

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